It’s official: Wiggins becomes first Brit to win Tour de France

What else did Bradley Wiggins need to do to prove he was the best rider in the Tour de France? Nothing, but he still proved it on Sunday in Paris, once again helping to lead out teammate Mark Cavendish to the Stage 20 win. So, the final classification  winners:

  • OVERALL: Bradley Wiggins, Chris Froome and Vincenzo Nabali
  • POINTS (Green Jersey): Peter Sagan
  • CLIMBER (Polka Dot): Thomas Voeckler
  • YOUNG RIDER (White): Tejay Vangarderen
  • TEAM: Radioshack-Nissan
  • COMBATIVE: Chris Anker-Sorensen

Learn more about the race at the Tour de France websiteincluding the overall standings.

Previous stage results during the Tour de France:

  • Stage 20: Bradley Wiggins grew his lead and cemented his grip on the overall victory by winning the time trial and extending his lead over everyone. Here’s what they were reading in The Guardian.
  • Drug test confirmed:Frank Schleck’s “B sample” has come back positive for a banned diuretic, the rider said on Friday. Schleck, who was pulled from the race on Tuesday when the first blood test came back positive, continues to insists he does not know how the banned drug got into his system. Read more.
  • Stage 18: Is there anything Bradley Wiggins can’t do? The overall race leader led out teammate Mark Cavendish to victory in Stage 18, the second of this tour by Cavendish  and the 22nd of his career, putting him in a tie with Lance Armstrong. Read more.
  • Stage 17: Leader Bradley Wiggins thrived on final day of difficult climbing in the Pyrenees to finish second in the stage (tied with teammate Chris Froome). Alejandro Valverde won the stage. Read more.
  • Rivalry? A simmering rivalry seems to be apparent between Wiggins and Froome, who has shown himself to be the stronger climber. During the final ascent in Stage 17 Froome pulled ahead and gestured at Wiggins to pick up the pace, which some riders suggested was disrespectful. Learn more.
  • Stage 16: The “circle of death,”  the nickname given to this stage’s brutal climbs, finished any chance for Cadel Evans to defend his Tour de France title, while Bradley Wiggins maintained his lead. Read more.
  • UPDATE: Luxembourg rider Frank Schleck, after testing positive for a forbidden diuretic at the Tour de France and being pulled from Stage 16, has suggested he may have been poisoned. Read more.
  • Day off: The schedule said Tuesday is a rest day at the Tour de France, but the teams in contention worked hard on strategy for the coming stages in the Pyrenees.  Read more.
  •  Stage 15: A day after tacks flattened 45 tires, the peleton experienced a sleepy day, letting a six-man breakaway escape and cruising to the finish as Pierrick Fedrigo earned France its fourth stage win this year when he edged American Christian Vande VeldeMore.
  • Stage 14: Luis León Sánchez won the 14th stage of the Tour de France with a brilliant ride, but most people will remember the stage for the sabotage committed by someone at the top of the final climb, where carpet tacks thrown on the road caused as many as 30 flat tires, including one for defending champion Cadel Evans. Race officials asked French police to investigate the incident on the Mur de Peguere climb.
  • Stage 13: German Andre Greipel won a photo-finish sprint to win his third stage victory of this Tour after pther top sprinters, including Mark Cavendish, were unable to keep up over a late climb and did not factor in the finish. Read more.
  • Stage 12: David Millar won his second stage ever at the Tour as part of a 5-rider breakout that stayed away for more than 130 miles. Read more.
  •  Stage 11: Bradley Wiggins moved closer toward becoming the first  Briton to win the Tour de France when he survived the toughest climbing stage to extend his lead, while Cadel Evans cracked on the final climb and fell to fourth. Read more. 
  • Stage 10: Briton Bradley Wiggins survived a day of climbing and kept the yellow jersey as Thomas Voeckler won the stage, followed by Michele Scarponi and Jens Voigt. Read about the stage.
  • Stage 9: Race leader Bradley Wiggins blitzed the field to win Stage 9,  a 41.5km time trial, and put some serious time into his rivals.  Wiggins explained why he’s a natural at time trials.
  • Stage 8: Bradley Wiggins performed well in Stage 8, won by Frenchman Thibaut Pinot,  to retain his overall lead. 
  • Stage 7: The real race begins as Bradley Wiggins takes possession of the overall lead after a climbing finish creates separation among the riders. Defending champion Cadel Evans finished third. More.
  • Stage 6: A large crash again dominated the news in Stage 6, causing several abandonments, while Peter Sagan won his third stage in this tour by besting Andre Greipel, winner of the previous two stages. Read more.
  • Stage 5: Andre Greipel again out-sprints the field for a win, besting his rival Mark Cavendish. 
  • Stage 4: Andre Greipel dodged a significant crash, which claimed Mark Cavendish, near the end of the stage and then sprinted to victory.
  • Stage 3: First-timer Peter Sagan of Liquigas-Cannondale captured Stage 3 with a convincing win in the final sprint to claim his second stage win.
  • Stage 2: Here’s how Mark Cavendish surged to win his 21st stage on the Tour. More.
  • Stage 1: See how Peter Sagan won in his first-ever Tour start over Fabian CancellaraMore
  • PrologueFabian Cancellara wins the prologue at the Tour de France for the fifth time. More

LAST YEAR: The  Tour de France in 2011 saw Cadel Evans claim victory with a late, stirring time-trial win. Andy (2nd) and Frank Schleck (3rd) became the first brothers to grace the podium together. Sammy Sanchez was King of the Mountains, Mark Cavendish earned the green jersey for most points, Pierre Rolland won the best young rider competition and Team Garmin-Cervelo was tops among teams.

Swany Gloves is dedicated to bringing you the best of outdoor adventure. Like us on Facebookfollow us on Twitter for updates on the Tour and more adventures.

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